^ Schönpflug, Karin, Feminism, Economics and Utopia: Time Travelling Through Paradigms (Oxon/London: Routledge, 2008 (ISBN 978-0-415-41784-6)), pp. 159–160 (author economist, Austrian Ministry of Finance, & lecturer, Univ. of Vienna), citing Rohrlich, R. & Elaine Hoffman Baruch, Women in Search of Utopia: Mavericks and Mythmakers (N.Y.: Schocken Books, 1984), and Plato, The Republic (ca. 394 B.C.).
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=eeCahRCgOfI

An intuitive understanding of this is probably why six in ten American adults think children are better off when one parent focuses full time on raising them. Mothers themselves, besides the three-quarters with young children who prefer part-time or no employment, also cite work flexibility and part-time work opportunities as desires in roughly equal proportions as wanting cheaper child care. Yet instead of exploring the preferences that are likely to yield better outcomes for children, politicians focus on programs we cannot afford that do not support what most women want nor is best for their kids. https://youtube.com/e/eeCahRCgOfI

The vast majority of childcare is still performed by the parents, in-house nanny or through informal arrangements with relatives, neighbors or friends. For example, in Canada, among two parent families with at least one working parent, 62% of parents handle the childcare themselves, 32% have other in-home care (nannies, relatives, neighbours or friends) and only 6.5% use a formal day care center.[63]

How Much For Child Day Care Centennial


The National Institute of Health released a study in March, 2007 after following a group of children through early childhood to the 6th grade.[89] The study found that the children who received a higher quality of childcare scored higher on 5th grade vocabulary tests than the children who had attended childcare of a lower quality. The study also reported that teachers found children from childcare to be "disobedient", fight more frequently, and more argumentative. The study reported the increases in both aggression and vocabulary were small. "The researchers emphasized that the children’s behavior was within the normal range and were not considered clinically disordered." http://youtube.com/e/eeCahRCgOfI
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